March 18, 2012
theheroappears:

jtwigg365:

top: meg, shira, and i in metropolis, where we all (briefly, in my case) lived in 2006, age almost 21
bottom: me, meg, and shira at jacob c’s house, 2003, age 18
this is important and relevant because it is lady punk friend sisterbrother love that has lasted over 10 years. why did meg and i create the short girl wall of death? we were tired of dudebro bullshit at shows before we even had adequate language to explain it. so we got together and made something without them, even if it wasn’t perfect and didn’t last as that particular thing. i remember sitting in meg’s dad’s kitchen with a pile of tshirts and fabric paint and iron ons, painstakingly cutting out stencils because we didn’t know how to screenprint, eating ramen with the radio blasting classical music. sometimes i forget to give myself credit for all the ways i tried and resisted and created alternate choices, in my own way, even when i look back and remember feelings of isolation. i also remember these strong bonds that have endured and grown so solid, the bonds i can’t imagine living without or who i would be absent them.

Ten years later, holy smokes. I still have my Short Girl Wall of Death shirt. Jen, Shira, and Meg may never have known, but they made an incredible impression on me and I am who I am today because of it. In 2002 I was a freshman in high school and met an amazing group of friends through two bands called Spoont and The Max Levine Ensemble. From the start I really looked up to Jen, Shira, and Meg as incredibly radical and strong ladies. I found an understanding of feminism, of punk, of eating well, of thinking about privilege, about politics, and of living and making choices thatwere for me and being accountable. I always felt on the outside because I was younger and not allowed to go to Fort Posi (I remember that argument very clearly with my mom) or stay out very late at night, but my own shame for my own youth was only something I felt, and never something seen or validated by the group of friends I called my community. A lot has changed in ten years and the Baltimore/DC divide seems bigger than ever for me now, but the impressions are permanent. It’s been a good decade. And I hope that somewhere along the way I was able to pass on the love and support I was lucky to have in these three to other amazing young ladies.
Thanks for the guidance and friendship, y’all.   

awww Hillary! I love you!
I remember not feeling like I belonged in short girl wall of death because I was 5’7”—NO. JOKE.

theheroappears:

jtwigg365:

top: meg, shira, and i in metropolis, where we all (briefly, in my case) lived in 2006, age almost 21

bottom: me, meg, and shira at jacob c’s house, 2003, age 18

this is important and relevant because it is lady punk friend sisterbrother love that has lasted over 10 years. why did meg and i create the short girl wall of death? we were tired of dudebro bullshit at shows before we even had adequate language to explain it. so we got together and made something without them, even if it wasn’t perfect and didn’t last as that particular thing. i remember sitting in meg’s dad’s kitchen with a pile of tshirts and fabric paint and iron ons, painstakingly cutting out stencils because we didn’t know how to screenprint, eating ramen with the radio blasting classical music. sometimes i forget to give myself credit for all the ways i tried and resisted and created alternate choices, in my own way, even when i look back and remember feelings of isolation. i also remember these strong bonds that have endured and grown so solid, the bonds i can’t imagine living without or who i would be absent them.

Ten years later, holy smokes. I still have my Short Girl Wall of Death shirt. Jen, Shira, and Meg may never have known, but they made an incredible impression on me and I am who I am today because of it. In 2002 I was a freshman in high school and met an amazing group of friends through two bands called Spoont and The Max Levine Ensemble. From the start I really looked up to Jen, Shira, and Meg as incredibly radical and strong ladies. I found an understanding of feminism, of punk, of eating well, of thinking about privilege, about politics, and of living and making choices thatwere for me and being accountable. I always felt on the outside because I was younger and not allowed to go to Fort Posi (I remember that argument very clearly with my mom) or stay out very late at night, but my own shame for my own youth was only something I felt, and never something seen or validated by the group of friends I called my community. A lot has changed in ten years and the Baltimore/DC divide seems bigger than ever for me now, but the impressions are permanent. It’s been a good decade. And I hope that somewhere along the way I was able to pass on the love and support I was lucky to have in these three to other amazing young ladies.

Thanks for the guidance and friendship, y’all.   

awww Hillary! I love you!

I remember not feeling like I belonged in short girl wall of death because I was 5’7”—NO. JOKE.

(Source: jendilemma)

  1. shiramario reblogged this from theheroappears and added:
    awww Hillary! I love you! I remember not feeling like I belonged in short girl wall of death because I was 5’7”—NO....
  2. meganna reblogged this from theheroappears and added:
    Well hey, here’s the thing, without women supporting women, feminist allies, queer allies, and the space to imagine a...
  3. jendilemma posted this